The New Tax Code Video

 

Very Important info on the New Tax Law and the impact on Real Estate


Disclaimer: This guide is not meant to be a resource for tax advice but instead a resource for basic information concerning only certain aspects of the new tax code and how they may impact the real estate market. You should get tax advice from your accountant or tax preparer who will explain how the entire tax code will affect your personal return.


This information comes immediately after the new tax code became law. Some of the information may be revised as the analysis of the new law evolves.

When the tax code was originally being overhauled by the House and the Senate, there were three major proposals being considered that would have substantially impacted the residential real estate market:

♦ Changing the requirements for the exclusion of gain on the sale of a principal residence

♦ The reduction on the limit of the Mortgage Interest Deduction (MID)

♦ The elimination of the State and Local Tax deduction (SALT) which includes property taxes

Let’s look how the tax code has evolved from the original proposal, and decipher what impact experts believe it may have on the housing market.

1. Exclusion of gain on sale of a principal residence

Original Proposal: Owners would need to live in their house for at least 5 out of the last 8 years to claim this exemption. Under the former tax framework, a typical owner, who has lived in their house for at least 2 years out of the last 5 years, would be able to exclude the first $250,000 of gains if filing single or the first $500,000 if filing jointly.

The New Tax Code: No change. The “at least 2 years out of the last 5 years” requirement is unchanged.

Impact on the Market: None.

2. Mortgage Interest Deduction

Original Proposal: Reduce the limit on the mortgage interest deduction (MID) amount from $1,000,000 to $500,000.

The New Tax Code: Reduces limit on deductible mortgage debt to $750,000 for new loans taken out after 12/14/17. Current loans up to $1 million are grandfathered.

Impact on the Market: Assuming a 20% down payment, this reduction in the MID will impact buyers that are purchasing a home between the prices of $938,000 and $1,250,000. Any home under the lower price is still covered and any home over the higher price was not covered under the former tax code either.

What does that mean to the market? Experts disagree.

Calculated Risk’s Bill McBride:

“I think the impact of reducing the MID from a maximum of $1 million in mortgage debt to $750 thousand in mortgage debt will have very little impact on the housing market.”

On the other hand, Capital Economics claims:

“The impact on expensive homes could be detrimental, with a limit on the mortgage interest deduction raising taxes for those that itemize.”

3. State and Local Taxes (SALT)

Original Proposal: The elimination of the state and local tax deduction (which includes property taxes).

The New Tax Code: Allows an itemized deduction of up to $10,000 for the total of state and local property taxes and income or sales taxes.

Impact on the Market: Most experts agree that higher taxed regions will be impacted as homeowners in those communities now have a cap on these deductions.

Calculated Risk’s Bill McBride stated:

“SALT will have an impact on housing in some areas. Some people might choose to live in one state over another (if they have a choice), based on taxation. This could impact demand in certain states – especially for the middle and upper-middle class homeowners.”

Mark Zandi of Moody’s Analytics said:

“The impact on house prices is much greater for higher-priced homes, especially in parts of the country where incomes are higher and there are thus a disproportionate number of itemizers, and where homeowners have big mortgages and property tax bills.”

What will be the overall impact on the housing market?

For most of the country, the new tax code will not have a negative impact on the market. As Capital Economics reports:

“Given most households will see an overall tax cut, and potential buyers are likely to put that saving towards their home, we doubt it will have a significant detrimental impact on the housing market.”

There is also no doubt that some higher priced, higher taxed regions will be affected more than others. However, most experts agree that other portions of the tax code will favor the high-end buyer and seller, and this might mitigate many concerns. McBride explains:

“The corporate tax cuts (and other tax cuts) will mostly benefit the wealthy, and this will be a positive for high end real estate.”

What does this all mean to you?

To know for sure, you should sit with your accountant or financial planner and explore how all the aspects of the new code will impact your family.

Most families consider homeownership an essential part of the American Dream, and don’t purchase a home based solely on the tax advantages. The main reasons they buy a home are personal (they just got married, they are looking for a good place to raise children, they want to be near friends and family, they want to better enjoy their retirement, etc.). This will never change.

Looking at the new tax code, Mr. McBride’s opinion makes the most sense:

“There will be some negative impact based on SALT, but overall the impact of these policy changes on housing will be minimal.”

 

Ady Simion Call/Text at (626) 607-8652 or email me at Ady@AdySimion.com

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About Ady Simion (Realtor and Public Notary)

Ady Simion was named in the Top 1% of all agents for NRT LLC a subsidiary of Realogy that operates a variety of real estate offices under brands such as Coldwell Banker, Sotheby's International Realty, Century 21, The Corcoran Group, and the technology-based brokerages ZipRealty and Climb Real Estate. NRT has 787 offices and 47,000 sales associates. Selling and buying property can be very stressful but with the right agent it can be profitable and a fun experience. Ady is also a Notary Public and being a people person he wants to help negotiate for his clients making their transactions as smooth as possible. Ady’s goals are simple: He wants to be the best source of information on the Los Angeles area Real Estate market, as he assists clients through each transaction with care and professionalism. He is proud of his large referral base of clients who have placed their trust in him over the years. Why him, when there are so many good people out there?!?! • Sellers will have their property exposed to the largest team of sales professionals in the world by far. Coldwell Banker Agents sale more homes than anyone else. • Buyers will have the opportunity to view more properties exclusively. • And most importantly when you hire him you get a whole team working for you not just “only one person”. Ady Simion started his Professional Career as an Insurance Agent, and then mastered the Mortgage Industry focusing on helping buyers and sellers achieve their life dreams. He now is an Agent with the Largest Residential Real Estate Company in the nation and the world, Coldwell Banker, at the Pasadena office which is the leader in the areas in which he specializes. After finishing College Ady has consistently been a Top Producer in every office/business he worked at. He speaks English, Romanian and Spanish. Real Estate is constantly changing and working with an agent that has been involved in the Real Estate buying/selling process most of his life is always beneficial for clients. Call, text or e-mail him or just stop by to say Hi and ask any real estate questions you may have.

Posted on February 15, 2018, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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